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Public Trust in US Corporations Increased During the COVID-19 Crisis

Source: Harris Poll COVID19 Tracker Wave 20; Chart: Axios Visuals

The American public has been responding favorably toward corporations since the start of the coronavirus outbreak. According to a new Axios/Harris poll, 75% of respondents believe that companies were more reliable than the federal government during the lockdown. 

The health and grocery industries saw the highest approval rating among consumers — at 47% and 35% respectively — while both the media (-5%) and airlines (-7%) industries scored the lowest. Respondents rated the top 100 companies across seven qualities: affinity and trust, citizenship, ethics, culture, vision, growth and products and services. The poll weighted affinity as the highest compared to all other categories. 

Companies that focused on using their resources and platform to solve problems related to COVID-19, like pharmacies, streaming services and packaged goods, gained the most trust from consumers. The results also showed that consumers have higher trust in companies that address societal issues. In the midst of the Black Lives Matter movement, this will most likely be a long-term trend beyond the pandemic.

U.S. Household Consumption Sees Dip in 2020, Still Outpaces Europe

The United States leads the world in consumption per capita, according to a recent article by Bloomberg opinion columnist Allison Schrager. An average household consumed $43,500 in goods in 2020, accounting for 67% of the GDP. The number has grown 43% since 1990.

Countries in Europe pale in comparison. Germany, for instance, had an average household consumption of $21,500 in 2020, accounting for 50% of its GDP. For Europe as a whole, household consumption per capita grew just 35% since 1990.

The rising trend in U.S. consumption, per the author, reflects the changing lifestyle that revolves around spending. Forty-three percent of American households own three T.V.’s, for instance, while clothing purchases have increased 500% since 1980. It also is a result of having more space to put things — the average U.S. home was 2,000 sq. ft. in 2015, compared to 1,700 sq. ft. in 1980.

Shifts in Precipitation Patterns Threaten Health and Food Security

Temperatures will rise between 1.8 and 2.4 degrees Celsius by 2100, according to a Climate Ambition Tracker analysis of the decarbonization commitments made by countries at the 2021 COP26, which does not rule out higher levels of warming. 

In its latest report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlights how climate change is shifting global precipitation patterns: On average, wet regions are expected to become wetter and dry regions drier. 

Extreme rainfall events are becoming more common, and flood risk is increasing. Climate change is also reducing water availability in many regions, exacerbating drought, wildfire and health risks. According to the World Health Organization, by as soon as 2025 half of the world’s population will be living in areas impacted by water scarcity. Changes in rainfall and rising temperatures will also compromise food security by reducing crop yields and livestock productivity.

How Much Could Global Warming Impact the World Economy?

The effects of a 3.2 degree Celsius warming would reduce global GDP by 18%, according to The Swiss Re Institute. The increase in global temperatures has already reached 1 degree Celsius and is accelerating. To contain global GDP losses to 4% by 2050, warming would have to be below 2 degrees Celsius.

In August, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change launched the first installment of its Sixth Assessment Report. The document posits that the Paris Agreement goal of holding global warming well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels will not be achieved without “immediate, rapid and large-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.” 

World leaders met in November at COP26 to redouble their commitments to curb emissions. According to the Climate Ambition Tracker, global temperatures are set to rise between 1.8 and 2.4 degrees Celsius by 2100, depending on whether all decarbonization targets announced at COP26 will be implemented, with the risk of even more pronounced warming. 

The Pandemic Is Weakening the Stigma Around Mental Health

The prevalence of anxiety and depression has doubled in some countries during the pandemic, according to a report from the OECD. “Risk factors generally associated with poor mental health — financial insecurity, unemployment, fear” have heightened since COVID-19 hit, the report says, while beneficial factors, including social connection, “fell dramatically.”

The study notes that “differences in the openness of populations to discussing their mental state also hampers cross-country comparability,” referring to the stigma around mental health. Mental health is stigmatized through negative judgements, discrimination or dismissiveness toward those with trauma, depression, etc., which becomes a barrier to getting help, according to NAMI. But the spike in mental health issues has also led to a growing willingness to recognize and talk about such issues — chipping away at the stigma

Most countries have increased mental health resources during the pandemic. But, the OECD says we need a systemic-level response that includes assured mental health services and employers who actively support and contribute to the mental health of their employees.

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