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US Struggles Most With Mental Health During COVID-19 Compared to Other High-Income Countries

Source: The Commonwealth Fund

One-third of U.S. adults report experiencing mental health challenges since the coronavirus outbreak started compared to about a quarter or less in other high-income countries. Research from The Commonwealth Fund shows that the U.S. had the highest rate of mental health diagnoses among high-income countries even before the pandemic.

More than 30% of Americans say they are experiencing negative economic impacts due to COVID-19 — much higher than the other countries surveyed. And 56% of U.S. adults who experienced COVID-related economic difficulties also reported experiencing mental health issues. 

Uncertainty about the virus’s spread, information overload and social isolation are some of the elements contributing to the decline in mental health, the fund’s research shows. A higher number of COVID-19 cases and low levels of public trust in the U.S. government are also factors. Only 33% of Americans believe that the U.S. government is responding well to the pandemic, while at least 49% of those in other countries reported positive views of their government’s response. 

2021’s Job Market Broke Records After the Losses of 2020

The 2021 labor market posted its biggest jobs gain in modern history, following the huge job losses of 2020, as lockdowns and restrictions were lifted throughout the United States. Following a year that uprooted the lives of many as companies struggled to stay afloat, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, an estimated 6.5 million jobs were gained in 2021, the most since 1939.

As the Omicron variant spreads throughout the world, however, economists warn that January and February job growth might be more muted. Furthermore, research shows that as many as 5 million members of the workforce might be sidelined as the highly contagious variant continues to spread. And, there is still a 3.6 million jobs deficit from the beginning of the pandemic.

How People Around the World Say AI Will Change Their Lives

The majority of people say that artificial intelligence will improve education, entertainment and transportation along with homes, shopping, safety, the environment and food/nutrition, in a survey conducted by Ipsos and led by the World Economic Forum. Overall, 60% of people think that AI will make their lives easier.

The survey explores attitudes from 28 countries around the world. It found nearly two-thirds of respondents expect AI will profoundly change their daily lives in the next three to five years. Respondents say that education, safety and employment are among the most likely areas to change. Thirteen percent, however, say that AI would not notably change any of the areas shown above, perhaps revealing some people’s skepticism of AI, as just 50% of respondents say they trust companies that use AI as much as they trust companies that don’t.

Previously on BRINK, we’ve covered how artificial intelligence can help businesses, healthy aging and cities.

 

The Greatest Risks for 2022 and Beyond

The health of our planet and societies are the biggest concerns for global risk experts, according to the 2022 Global Risk Report. The most consequential point may be that each of these categories is not mutually exclusive — all of them either balance or exacerbate the risks of the other. 

For example, climate change, measurably accelerated by human activity, has led to biodiversity loss, or the “depletion of the varied forms of life on Earth.” This, in turn, impacts our ability to stay healthy: “Exposure to a diverse range of microbes allows our bodies to mount an effective defensive response against pathogens,” according to ecologist Jake Robinson. 

The declining health of our planet and people can then fracture social cohesion, another highly ranked concern from the report’s survey respondents. We’ve seen social cohesion weaken both physically, as we experienced lockdowns over the last two years, and mentally and emotionally, in terms of the political dimension of COVID-19 and the pandemic’s impact on mental health. The intersectionality of the risks means that efforts to mitigate them need to be considered holistically — and that improvements in one area can positively impact another. 

Pandemic and Trump Bump for Media Faded In 2021

The news industry is in dire straits, according to a recently published analysis by Axios. Comparing performance for 2021 to the year prior, top news companies saw a decrease of 65% of social media interactions and a 33% decrease in app downloads. Cable news primetime viewers, similarly, fell by 36%.

Furthermore, unique visits to the top five websites fell 8%. An earlier report by Axios pointed to some publishers seeing as much as a 43% decrease in traffic in the first half of 2021.

The decrease in traffic coincided with the inauguration of President Joe Biden, who intended to be a “no drama” president. As vaccines were deployed, the reopening of the economy meant less focus on COVID-19, which drove a lot of the engagement in 2020. The decrease in engagement also comes as alternative media formats, such as podcasts, continue to increase in popularity, leading to a fragmentation of attention.

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