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Public Views of US Business Sectors Are Plummeting

Americans rated U.S. business industries at their lowest points since 2011 during the COVID-19 pandemic. The average record-low, according to Gallup, was during the 2008 Great Recession at 34% — just five percentage points lower than the current average of 39%.

Of the 25 industries ranked, the federal government, the most negatively rated industry since 2014, was again viewed the most negatively by the American public at 31%, followed by the oil and gas and pharmaceutical industries. This year, Americans rated a mere four industries positively — farming and agriculture at 59%, restaurants at 58%, the grocery industry at 54% and the computer industry at 51%. In the past three years, farming and agriculture and the restaurant industry were the top-ranked sectors.

Public sentiment toward certain sectors is related to how they responded to the pandemic, states Gallup. However, as a whole, the public has trusted businesses more than other institutions during the pandemic.

Insurer Premiums Are Aligning to Net-Zero Targets

Several major insurers and reinsurers are committing to transitioning their underwriting portfolios to net-zero by 2050, as part of the newly formed Net-Zero Insurance Alliance (NZIA). 

Launched in July 2021, NZIA includes eight institutions with over $400 billion in gross written insurance premiums and $130 billion in gross written reinsurance premiums. These figures account for 22% and 59% of global gross written insurance and reinsurance premiums among listed carriers, respectively. 

The reinsurance sector is highly concentrated. Consequently, net-zero commitments among a small number of the largest reinsurers place the reinsurance sector some way ahead of the insurance sector. In turn, this is expected to increase pressure on insurers to align their underwriting portfolios with net-zero. Over time, those that do not may find it harder to cede risks to net-zero-aligned reinsurers. 

How the Pandemic Affected the Non-Insured Population

Rates for those without health insurance in the U.S. remained relatively stable in 2020, according to data from the Census Bureau, analyzed by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Results show that 10.2%, or 27.4 million nonelderly people, were uninsured throughout 2020, a 400,000 increase from 2018.

The uninsured rate among nonelderly non-Hispanic Black people increased from 10.5% in 2018 to 11.7% in 2020, while the rate for Asian people decreased from 7.7% in 2018 to 6.4% in 2020. Although a majority of those insured were covered by their employer’s insurance, the 41.3% that weren’t shows a need for personalized health care plans.

Eugene Sayan, founder of Softheon, a cloud-based health insurance exchange and service provider, predicts a sea change in health care. “There’s a great opportunity to break down this macroeconomy around health care under the pillars of Medicaid, Medicare, the marketplace and commercial,” says Sayan. “What we’re going to start to see is consumers, individuals, empowerment taking so many different shapes.”

What Are the Biggest Upcoming Risks for Organizations?

Changes in consumer demand and cyberattacks are the two biggest risks organizations expect to face in the next two years, according to polls undertaken by Marsh McLennan. Other notable risks include workforce and industry disruptions, as well as challenges associated with international trade.

The poll results also show that the risk outlook of businesses is heavily influenced by their sector. For example, financial sector companies highlighted digital risks — stemming from new technology adoption and cyberattacks — while industrial sector firms were most concerned about international trade.

Today’s dynamic global risk environment necessitates that organizations proactively navigate upcoming risks. Those that manage to do so will emerge more resilient and agile in the face of future disruptions.

Africa Tops All Continents in Retail-Sized Crypto Transfers

When it comes to cryptocurrency use, Africa leads the world in retail-sized transfers (those under $10,000), according to new data from crypto analysis firm Chainalysis. 

The 2020 Geography of Crypto report concludes that this is likely due to a large number of African expats using cryptocurrency to transfer money back home. Cryptocurrency provides a low-fee way for those living abroad to transfer money across country lines. Though many consider crypto a volatile investment, it can be more reliable in countries with a history of currency instability. 

This data also demonstrates the efficacy of cryptocurrency in providing a means for economic growth, and venture capitalists like Jack Dorsey have taken notice. Recently, African-focused cryptocurrency exchange Yellow Card announced it has raised $15 million in Series A funding by the likes of Valar Ventures, Third Prime and Castle Island Ventures, with Dorsey’s Square also participating. It is the largest crypto-focused venture investment on the continent.

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